4th Infantry Division

The 8th Infantry Regiment of the 4th Division was one of the first Allied units to hit the beaches at Normandy on D-day, 6 June 1944. Relieving the isolated 82d Airborne Division at Ste. Mere Eglise, the 4th cleared the Cotentin peninsula and took part in the capture of Cherbourg, 25 June. After taking part in the fighting near Periers, 6-12 July, the Division broke through the left flank of the German Seventh Army, helped stem the German drive toward Avranches, and by the end of August had moved to Paris, assisting the French in the liberation of their capital.

The 4th then moved into Belgium through Houffalize to attack the Siegfried Line at Schnee Eifel, 14 September, and made several penetrations. Slow progress into Germany continued in October, and by 6 November the Division reached the Hurtgen Forest, where a severe engagement took place until early December. It then shifted to Luxembourg, only to meet the German winter offensive head-on, 16 December 1944.

Although its lines were dented, it managed to hold the Germans at Dickweiler and Osweiler, and, counterattacking in January across the Sauer, overran German positions in Fouhren and Vianden. Halted at the Prum in February by heavy enemy resistance, the Division finally crossed 28 February near Olzheim, and raced on across the Kyll, 7 March. After a short rest, the 4th moved across the Rhine 29 March at Worms, attacked and secured Wurzburg and by 3 April had established a bridgehead across the Main at Ochsenfurt. Speeding southeast across Bavaria, the Division had reached Miesbach on the Isar, 2 May 1945, when it was relieved and placed on occupation duty.

Unit awards
Medal Of Honor
Medal Of Honor
Awarded: 3
Distinguished Service Cross
Distinguished Service Cross
Awarded: 60
Distinguished Service Medal
Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded: 2
Silver Star
Silver Star
Awarded: 1.283
Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
Awarded: 15
Soldier's Medal
Soldier's Medal
Awarded: 22
Bronze Star
Bronze Star
Awarded: 6.795
Air Medal
Air Medal
Awarded: 78
Combat chronicle
  • 10 January 1944: First Army
  • 14 January 1944: V Corps, First Army
  • 2 February 1944: VII Corps
  • 16 July 1944: VIII Corps
  • 19 July 1944: VII Corps
  • 1 August 1944: VII Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
  • 22 August 1944: V Corps
  • 8 November 1944: VII Corps
  • 7 December 1944: VIII Corps
  • 20 December 1944: III Corps, Third Army, 12th Army Group
  • 21 December 1944: XII Corps.
  • 27 January 1945: VIII Corps.
  • 10 March 1945: 12th Army Group, but attached to Seventh Army, 6th Army Group.
  • 20 March 1945: VI Corps, Seventh Army, 6th Army Group.
  • 25 March 194.5: XXI Corps.
  • 8 April 1945: Seventh Army, 6th Army Group.
  • 2 May 1945: Third Army, 12th Army Group.
  • 6 May 1945: III Corps, Third Army, 12th Army Group.

Ivy Division

4th Infantry Division
Original WW2 patch
Four green ivy leaves attached at the stems and opening at the four corners of a squadron on brown background.

Nicknamed: Ivy Division

Slogan: Steadfast and Loyal

Activated: 3 June 1940
Inactivated: 5 March 1946

Days of combat: 299

Date overseas: 18 January 1944

Casualties of the 4th Infantry Division
Killed in action: 4.488
Wounded in action: 16.985
Missing in action: 860
Captured: 121
Non battle: 13.091
Total casualties: 35.545

12
Unit Citations: 12
4th Infantry Division
Commanders of the 4th Infantry Division during WW2
Maj.. Gen. Walter E. Prosser

Maj.. Gen. Walter E. Prosser

June - October 1940
Maj. Gen. Lloyd R. Fredendall

Maj. Gen. Lloyd R. Fredendall

October 1940 - July 1941
Maj. Gen. Oscar W. Griswold

Maj. Gen. Oscar W. Griswold

August - September 1941
Maj. Gen. Harold R. Bull

Maj. Gen. Harold R. Bull

October - November 1941
Maj. Gen. Terry de la Mesa

Maj. Gen. Terry de la Mesa

December 1941
Maj. Gen. Fred C. Wallace

Maj. Gen. Fred C. Wallace

January - June 1942
Maj. Gen. Raymond 0. Barton

Maj. Gen. Raymond 0. Barton

July 1942 - December 1944
Maj. Gen. Harold W. Blakeley

Maj. Gen. Harold W. Blakeley

December 1944 - October 1945

Campaigns

Normandy

Central Europe

Northern France

Rhineland

Ardennes-Alsace

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