Homefront in the United States of America

The 'home front' covers the activities of the civilians in a nation at war. WW2 was a total war; homeland production became even more invaluable to both the Allied and Axis powers. Life on the home front during World War II was a significant part of the war effort for all participants and had a major impact on the outcome of the war. Governments became involved with new issues such as rationing, manpower allocation, home defense, evacuation in the face of air raids, and response to occupation by an enemy power. The morale and psychology of the people responded to leadership and propaganda. Typically women were mobilized to an unprecedented degree. Among morale-boosting activities that also benefited combat efforts, the home front engaged in a variety of scrap drives for materials crucial to the war effort such as metal, rubber, and rags. Such drived helped strengthen civilian morale and support for the war effort. Between 1939 and 1944, the OWI and the Farm Security Administration made thousands of photographs, approximately 1,600 of them in color. In the early war years, OWI photographers Alfred Palmer and Howard Hollem produced some exceptional Kodachrome transparencies depicting military preparedness, factory operations, and women in the work force.

United States of America
  • Photographs
  • Homefront in the United States of America
Copyright of the pictures: Alfred Palmer/OWI/LOC. The historical pictures used on this website are owned by the veterans who made them or by whomever made the pictures/videos (mostly these images are in the public domain and can be freely used). The use of the photos is purely from a history point of view and is not intended to be of malicious intent. If you are the owner of any picture(s) that you wish to remove from this website.
All help is very much appreciated
This project is a private labor of love. But you can help if you want! If you have a story you would like to add you (war veteran, civilian or Holocaust) or maybe you have old photographs of WW2 or small documents or items regarding WW2 that you would consider donating, then please contact me by clicking the button below.

This website is made out of respect for the victims, the civilians and the veterans of WWII. It generates no financial gain what so ever and it is merely a platform to educate the visitor about WWII.


The personal stories on this website are under copyright of the veterans themselves and the families or people who gave the stories to me. Pictures used on this webiste are owned by the veterans who made them or by whomever made the pictures/videos (mostly these images are in the public domain and can be freely used). Also bits of texts have been used with no harmful intent in any way. If you are the owner of any picture(s) or fragments of texts that you wish to remove from this website please contact me. But I ask you to look at the nature of the website and it's goal, educating the viewer about WW2.

A big THANK YOU to the United States Army Center of Military History for their help in providing the input for these pages. All pages on this website are constantly being refitted with acurate data and texts and it is an ongoing process.


Copyright D-Day, Normandy and Beyond 2000-present